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SULUY SAYS “HELLO”

Our Post Release Monitoring (PRM) team awoke to a sunny morning as they prepared to undertake a routine patrol in the forest. As usual, Camp Nles Mamse was our team’s departure point for the day’s expedition. Yunus and Ransik set off to explore transect 16 at eight o’clock in the morning, just as the birds began to sing.

Two hours passed quickly, and our team observed various signs of orangutans present in the area. Not far from the tract, the long-awaited one was finally seen: Suluy, a wild orangutan who has recently appeared in areas close to the main transect. Previously, Suluy was often seen with Signe’s family. Now he is monitored alone.

(Photo Credit: BOSF | YUNUS)

Suluy looked comfortable on top of his nest, about 4 meters off of the ground. Our PRM team recorded every movement, action, and the body condition score (BCS) of Suluy which turned out to be a three. This score indicates that his physical condition is good and his weight is ideal.

However, Suluy did not just stay in his nest. The orangutan began to move swiftly through the trees, exploring branches, and foraging for natural foods. He seemed to enjoy the fruits of the Mahang tree (Macaranga sp.), chewed on the tops of the Combrang plant (Etlingera elatior), and grabbed the young leaves from the tips of the branches for a snack.

The sun was sinking as the PRM team followed Suluy along the main transect. In the dwindling light, Suluy, suddenly turned and disappeared, leaving Yunus and Ransik alone with the thousands of insects singing their evening chorus. Heading home with tired steps, our PRM team finally returned to the camp and rested after a long day. Live well in the forest, Suluy. We cannot wait to see you become an accomplished explorer!

Text by: PRM Team at Camp Nles Mamse, Kehje Sewen Forest, East Kalimantan

Will you help us rescue, rehabilitate and release orangutans back to freedom? Thank you!

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